Why we need a new approach to teaching digital literacy 

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JOEL BREAKSTONE (breakstone@stanford.edu; @joelbreakstone) is director of the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG).
SARAH MCGREW (smcgrew@stanford.edu) is a doctoral candidate at Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.
MARK SMITH (msmith4@stanford.edu) is director of assessment at the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) at Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.
TERESA ORTEGA (teortega@stanford.edu) is a project manager at Stanford History Education Group (SHEG), Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.
SAM WINEBURG (wineburg@stanford.edu; @samwineburg) is the Margaret Jacks Professor of Education, all at Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif. He is the author of Why Learn History (When it’s Already on your Phone) (University of Chicago Press, 2018).

4 comments

  • Dean

    ,Necessitates independent thought, negating stratification, family and peer pressure conformity.

  • Thank you, this is a very timely read for me as a newbie Teacher-librarian and an ex Science teacher. I had used the C.R.A.A.P test once last year and found it failed fabulously when used to evaluate the Australian Museum’s wonderful Australia Drop Bear site at https://australianmuseum.net.au/drop-bear for all the reasons articulated in your report.
    I have been inspired by your information to create an infographic for my Australian students that scaffolds the process used by ‘fact-checkers’. Any advice would be immensely appreciated.
    I am more than halfway through my own studies in a Masters of Education (teacher-librarianship at QUT). I work in a secondary school system situated in an impoverished demographic with limited access to school based technology, yet paradoxically, ubiquitous access by students to their prepaid smart phones. I am highly motivated to activate critical thinking in my students so that they may begin to effectively evaluate their ‘infowhelm’ online. I in my own studies I am working to create and disseminate useful digital content in the area of bridging the digital literacy divide.
    Your recommendations on fact-checker processes would be greatly appreciated.
    Regards,

  • When I іnitially commented I clicked the “Notify me when new comments are added” checkbox and now eaсh time a comment
    is added I get several e-mails with the same
    comment. Iѕ there any way you can remove people from tһat service?
    Thanks a lot!

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